Simple Knit Ball

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Note that these are the original instructions from when I first wrote them.  (The written notes I have somewhere in one of my notebooks is even worse)  I have rewritten the instructions to (hopefully) be more clear.

Simple Knit Ball

Time Rating
One Hour

History & Notes
I made the pattern for this ball ages ago as the head for a doll. Never made it past there, but it actually makes a better ball. It’s knitted flat and sewed up the side. The suggested needles and yarn are what I designed it on. Anything will work though. The ball is all stockinette stitch.

Gauge
Doesn’t matter

Suggested Needle Size and Yarn
US Size 6
Worsted weight yarn.

Pattern
-Co 6
-K 1 row
-P and inc in every st (12 sts)
-Work 2 rows even
-K and inc in every st (24 sts)
-Work 9 rows even
-Dec in every st (12 sts)
-Work 2 rows even
-Dec in every st (6 sts)
-K 1 row

Break yarn and pull through remaining stitches. Pull tight and then sew up side of ball. Stuff to desired firmness. Run the sewing yarn through the cast on stitches, pull tight, and fasten off.

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New Notes

Yeah, I certainly could have written that better if I’d actually known the names of the increases and decreases I used.  Not that it really matters, since my goal was to double or halve the stitches.  With that in mind, anything (written like this) is a note.  Usually about ways you may want to try something different.  For example, I currently don’t think long-tail cast on is the best cast on for the job, provisional may be better.

Yarn, Needles, & Gauge

Not particularly important.  Pick something that won’t let too much stuffing show through and you ought to be good.

Pattern

– Cast on 6 stitches.  (Note that I originally designed this with a long tail cast on, but anything ought to work)

– Knit a row.

– Pfb across row – 12 sts (You can alternatively use any increase you want as long as you double the amount of stitches)

– Starting with a knit row, work 2 rows in stst

– Kfb across row – 24 sts (Same as last increase row, just double the stitches)

– Starting with a purl row, work 9 rows in stst

– K2Tog across – 12 sts (Same as increases, you just want to halve the stitches here)

– Starting with a purl row, work 2 rows stst

– P2tog – 6 sts (Halve the stitches again)

– Knit 1 row

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I’m stuck with just my laptop’s webcam at the moment, so please excuse the slightly blurry pics.  These two samples were made with size 8 needles and Red Heart Super Saver yarn.  They’re really quite quick to make, and ridiculously easy.

Squares and Triangles Hat

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Affectionately nicknamed the “I heart grannies” hat.

https://i2.wp.com/img.photobucket.com/albums/v401/butterfly_girl_22/th_S6300561.jpg

This hat doesn’t have to be made with granny squares, but they’re one of the simpler squares out there. I’ve provided instructions for them, but feel free to substitute with any square and triangle pattern you wish. Pay specific attention to anything bold and underlined.

Finished Diameter: Approximately 20 inches

Now this isn’t so much a pattern, as a recipe. I give you the basic direction, and you fill in where needed. You could even knit the squares and triangles if you so desire.

First thing you need is a square pattern. Below is directions for a basic granny square, but feel free to substitute with any square. Instructions are written the best I can for beginners, so please feel free to skip this section if you already know how to make a granny square.

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Basic Granny Square
Ch 4 and join to first ch with a slst to make a ring.

-Ch 3 (counts as a dc), 2 dc in ring, ch 3. (3 dc in ring, ch 3) 3 times, join to top of the beginning ch 3. (4 dc groups and 4 ch 3 spaces)

-Slst in each dc to and into next ch3 space. Ch 3 (counts as dc), 2 dc in same space, ch 3, 3 dc in same space, ch 1. *(3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc, ch 1) in next ch 3 space. Repeat from * in each remaining ch 3 space. Join to top of original ch 3. (8 dc groups, 4 ch 3 spaces, 4 ch 1 spaces)

-You should see a pattern emerging, so this part is written a little differently. Again, slst to and into the next ch3 space. Ch 3 (counts as dc), 2 dc in same space, ch 3, 3 dc in same space, ch 1.
Next is a chain 1 space. Into this space, put 3 dc and then ch 1.
Now we have a chain 3 space. In this space, (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc, ch 1).
Continue working around like this, following the instructions for ch1 and ch3 spaces as you come the them. Then join to the top of the starting ch3.

-To keep making the square bigger, simply keep working like the previous round, putting (3 dc, ch 1) in each ch1 space you come to, and putting (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc, ch 1) in each ch3 space you come to.

I apologize if this has only served to confuse you, as this is simply the way I see granny squares. Here’s a couple of links that might work better for you:
http://pumamouse.com/crochetbasicgrannys.html
http://www.jpfun.com/patterns/free/granny_squares/f101001basicgranny.shtml

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Next you need to know the size of your finished square. I would suggest sticking to 4 or 5 inch squares, but go ahead and use larger or smaller as you wish.

Divide 20 by the size of your chosen square. This is how many squares you need to make for the diameter. This is why I suggest 4 or 5 inch squares. But as long as it comes out even (or real close to even because most crochet stretches pretty good) you ought to be fine.

Now you need a triangle pattern. I used a basic granny triangle pattern, which is a just a granny square with one less side. If you want to use my instructions for a granny square, simply replace the first round of -Ch 3 (counts as a dc), 2 dc in ring, ch 3. (3 dc in ring, ch 3) 3 times, join to top of the beginning ch 3. (4 dc groups and 4 ch 3 spaces) with this:

-Ch 3 (counts as a dc), 2 dc in ring, ch 3. (3 dc in ring, ch 3) 2 times, join to top of the beginning ch 3. (3 dc groups and 3 ch 3 spaces)

This type of triangle tends to turn into a shallow cup but it’s ok.

Measure the length of one side of your triangle and then divide 20 by that amount. That is how many you need. You probably don’t want to go much smaller than 4 inch sides. Smaller than that and your hat will have too small of a crown. If you are using 4 or 5 inch squares, it’s best to use that same size for your triangles to make it easy.

Sew all the squares into a strip. If you want your hat body to be longer than just that strip, feel free to add more rows of squares to the bottom.

Lay the strip horizontally and sew the triangles to the top. If you used triangles the same size as your squares, it’s as simple as sewing one triangle to the top of each square. If they are different sizes, just start at one end and work across.

Sew the ends of the strip to each other to make a loop. Don’t sew the triangles just yet though. This is a good point to try on the hat and see if it fits.

Sew the seams between each triangle. This forms the crown of the hat. Don’t forget to sew up the hole that forms between the top points.

Weave in ends and enjoy!

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Here is an example showing the specs of my hat

Please excuse the paint diagrams, I didn’t take pictures.

I used red heart super saver and an H hook. Using the granny’s described above, I did four rounds and they turned out to be about 5 inches.

Which means I needed a grand total of 4 of each. Here’s them sewn into a strip with the triangles sewn on top.

Then it was sewn into a ring:

And then the crown was sewn up:

If the written instructions confuse you, I hope these badly drawn diagrams help.

Do note that this ought to work just as good with knitted squares and triangles as it would with crocheted ones.

So Easy I Could Knit it Blindfolded Fingerless Mitts

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I wish I hadn’t lost the story that went along with this.  Basically, I knitted this blindfolded. 😛

I managed to save the story!

**Gauge and Materials**
WW Yarn
Size 8 Needles
Gauge: 4 sts to 1 in

**Pattern**
With Worsted Weight yarn and size 8 needles

– CO 28 stitches
– Work in 2×2 ribbing for 30 rows or until long enough
– BO in pattern

Sew up the side, leaving a gap for your thumb

Mini Coin Pouch

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I was interested by descriptions in books of various characters that carried things in pouches around their necks (Harry Potter for example). Half asleep last one night, I decided to have a go at it. I knew it would have to be small so that it wouldn’t show through your clothes, and it had to be made of something that wouldn’t itch. So here it is, a really simple (barely worth even calling a pattern) bag that you can string up as a necklace if you’d like. Actually, you can do anything you like with it. The actual knitting took maybe an hour.

You’re going to need 3 double pointed needles. It’s knitted flat in a simple form of double knitting and the 3rd needle will be used in the BO.

Gauge is relatively unimportant. I used whatever needles I had on hand, and since this is such a quick knit it would probably be simpler to just knit the thing in your chosen needles and frog if you don’t like the size rather than bothering with checking gauge.

**Gauge and Materials**
Worsted Weight Cotton
3 size 6 DPN’s
Gauge: About 4 sts to 1 inch, though exact gauge isn’t that big a deal.

**Pattern Notes**
This pattern is worked in a form of double knitting to make a round pouch even though you appear to be working flat. You will do most of the work with two needles and bring in the third to help BO.

**Pattern St**
K1, bring yarn to front as if to purl, slip 1, bring yarn to the back

**Actual Pattern**
CO 12 sts.
Work in pattern st for 18 rows.

Slip the first st onto one free needle.  Slip the second stitch onto the other free needle.  Continue like this (alternating needles) until all the stitches have been slipped and the two sides of the pouch have been separated.

Starting with the needle that doesn’t have the working yarn attached and working around the opening, BO all the stitches.  Before finishing off the last loop, use a crochet hook or something to pull the loop through the first bound off stitch to close up the gap, and then finish it off.

Weave in the ends.  Cut a length of yarn and run through a row a little below the top to make a draw string.  Optionally string up on a chain or long piece of yarn to turn it into a necklace.

Granny’s Got Heart (dishcloth)

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Note that this dishcloth is a bit small compared to many out there.

Yarn – Favorite worsted weight cotton, I like Peaches n Cream
Needles – US Size 6 or your favorite dishcloth needles

CO 4
– K2, yo, knit to end of row
– Repeat previous row until there are 35 sts.
– K2, yo, k2tog, knit to end of row
– Repeat previous row 5 more times (for a total of 6)
– K1, k2tog, yo, k2tog, knit to end of row
– Repeat previous row once more (now have 33 sts)

Now to Split
– K1, k2tog, yo, k2tog, k12. Place the remaining sts onto a holder (now have 16 sts)
– K1, k2tog, yo, k2tog, knit to end of row (now have 15 sts)
– K1, k2tog, yo, k2tog, knit until 3 sts remain, k2tog, k1 (13 sts)
– K1, k2tog, yo, k2tog, k1, k2tog, knit to end of row (11 sts)
– K1, k2tog, yo, k2tog, knit to end of row (10 sts)
– Repeat previous row once more (9 sts)
– K1, k2tog, yo, (k1, yo) twice, k2tog twice (still 9)
– K2tog, knit to last 2 sts, k2tog
– K2tog at the beginning and end of row WHILE binding off all sts. Meaning, k2tog, k1, pass stitch over, k1, pass stitch over…etc…until 2sts left, k2tog, pass stitch over
– Cut yarn and fo

Other Side
Using this picture as a guide, put the first stitch from the first row of the split onto the needle. Now grab all the stitches from the holder. (more pics here and here) There will be 17 stitches on the needle.

Starting at the beginning of the Split section, attach the yarn and repeat everything as for the first side. Obviously you should ignore the instructions to put stitches onto a holder. Make sure the first row is worked from the outside edge in towards the center edge just like the first one was.

Top Down Hat Increases for 2×2 Ribbing

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This is honestly and truly the warmest hat I have ever had the pleasure to wear.  Yarn is natural colored Lion Brand Fisherman’s Wool dyed with Kool-aid.  The hat is ridiculously simple to knit, and wonderfully soothing in the k2 p2 repetition.  If you’re on Ravelry, check out all the pictures of the hat from just dyed yarn to done. 😀

Note as of April 21, 2012: I have hopefully managed to make my instructions clearer and have added a chart. I’ve always found it a bit disappointing that there aren’t very many top down hat instructions out there. Working from the crown of a hat can be fiddly, but I think it’s worth it because this way you don’t have to guess how much length the crown will add or how much yarn it will take.

Below you will find written instructions for working this hat flat (the way I originally designed it), written instructions for in the round, and a chart that will work for either. You will also find my original “talky version” at the bottom that I had originally written up because I didn’t know how to chart it. I’ve left it in case there are those out there who think like me and find it helpful.

Special Stitches
KP – Knit and then purl into the same stitch
PK – Purl and then knit into the same stitch
How to cast on in a loop
Suggested Bind Off

Gauge
5 sts to 1 inch, however once you get the hang of the increases, it’s easy to adapt this to any stitch count that is a multiple of 8.

 

Written Instructions – FLAT

Co 8 into a loop, leaving a long enough tail to sew hat up with later. Note: There is no selvage stitch included in these instructions

1. (k1, p1) to end – This is the right side
2. (kfb, pfb) to end
3. (k2, pfb twice) to end
4. (k1, kp, pk, k1, p2) to end
5. (k2, pfb twice, k2, p2) to end
6. (k2, p2, k1, kp, pk, k1, p2) to end
7. (k2, pfb twice, [k2, p2] twice) to end
8. ([k2, p2] twice, k1, kp, pk, k1, p2) to end
9. (k2, pfb twice, [k2, p2] 3 times) to end
10. ([k2, p2] 3 times, k1, kp, pk, k1, p2) to end
11. (k2, pfb twice, [k2, p2] 4 times) to end
12. ([k2, p2] 4 times, k1, kp, pk, k1, p2) to end

At this point you will have 96 stitches on the needles.

Work in 2×2 ribbing until it is the length you want, then Bo].  Pull top tight and sew up side.

 

 

Written Instructions – ROUND

Co 8 into a loop and join for working in the round. Note: This is fiddly as heck to begin with in the round, but worth it in my opinion

1. (k1, p1) to end
2. (kfb, pfb) to end
3. (k2, pfb twice) to end
4. (k2, p1, pk, kp, p1) to end
5. (k2, pfb twice, k2, p2) to end
6. (k2, p1, pk, kp, p1, k2, p2) to end
7. (k2, pfb twice, [k2, p2] twice) to end
8. (k2, p1, pk, kp, p1, [k2, p2] twice) to end
9. (k2, pfb twice, [k2, p2] 3 times) to end
10. (k2, p1, pk, kp, p1, [k2, p2] 3 times) to end
11. (k2, pfb twice, [k2, p2] 4 times) to end
12. (k2, p1, pk, kp, p1, [k2, p2] 4 times) to end

At this point you will have 96 stitches on the needles.

Work in 2×2 ribbing until it is the length you want, then Bo]. Pull top tight and sew up side.

 

 

CHART

Click on the chart to view it bigger.

 

 

Talky Version
Because sometimes it’s hard to understand what exactly I’m having you do just from the instructions, here’s basically what’s happening:

-You start with 4 repeats of k1, p1 ribbing in a ring.

-You increase every stitch to make 4 repeats of k2, p2 ribbing

-You increase all of the purls

-Where you have each group of 4 stitches the same, work as such:
a) Work first stitch as is
b) Work second stitch as is, but don’t slip off of needle.  Twist around and work the opposite into the same stitch. (in flat knitting, this stitch is a knit.  Knit into it, then purl into it)
c) Work 3rd stitch opposite and don’t slip off needle.  Twist around and work the opposite of the stitch you just did. (again, in flat knitting you purl and then knit into the same stitch)
d) Finally work last stitch as is

-Now you will increase every other purl ridge.

-Work groups of 4 same stitches as before.

-Now increase every third purl ridge

-Work groups of 4 same stitches as before.

And so on and so on, increasing only in the original 4 purl ridges until you have the required stitch count. (96 stitches for the hat I did)

Then just work 2×2 rib for the required length.  I suggest this bind off because it’s awesomely stretchy.